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This Vultur app takes malicious to the next level

1 day 13 hours ago

A Netherlands security research firm has uncovered a new Android dropper app, dubbed Vultur, that delivers legitimate functionality, then silently shifts into malicious mode when it detects banking and other financial activities.

Vultur, found by ThreatFabric, is a keylogger that captures financial institution credentials by piggybacking  on the current banking session and stealing funds right away — invisibly. And just in case the victim realizes what is happening, it locks down the screen.

(Note: Always have your bank's phone number so that a direct call to a local branch might save your money — and keep the number on paper. If it's on your phone and the phone is locked, you're out of luck.)

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Evan Schuman

For Windows security, what we have is a failure to communicate

3 days 8 hours ago

Microsoft last week reported $60 billion in profit and $165 billion in sales for its most recent year — with a staggering increase in cloud revenues. But that good news comes in a year when not a day goes by without reports of another security issue, another ransomware attack. Yes, Windows 11 will require hardware that should bring with it better security, but it comes at a price. Most users have systems that won’t support Windows 11, so we’ll be stuck using Windows 10.

There seems to be a big disconnect between the reality (and financial success) of the Windows ecosystem and the reality for its users. We need more security now, not later.

[ Related: What enterprise needs to know about Windows 11 ]

For many people, malware often infiltrates systems via phishing lures and enticing links. Microsoft could serve users better by recommending security solutions we have on our systems now that aren’t enabled. Some of these settings don’t require additional licensing, while others are gated behind the holy grail of Windows licensing — the Microsoft 365 E5 license. While a user can purchase a single E5 license to get the included security enhancements, it raises a concern that Microsoft is starting to make security an add-on to the OS rather than built in. I remember when Microsoft talked up “Secure by Design,” “Secure by Default,” and “Secure in Deployment and Communication" (also known as SD3+C). Now, instead, it is touting security solutions with its E5 licensing rather than those already in Windows that could protect us better.

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Susan Bradley

Online privacy: Best browsers, settings, and tips

6 days 13 hours ago

“You have zero privacy anyway. Get over it,” Scott McNealy said of online privacy back in 1999, a view the former CEO of the now-defunct Sun Microsystems reiterated in 2015. Despite the hue and cry his initial remarks caused, he’s been proven largely correct.

Other ways to protect yourself on the web: GDPR, CCPA, and AdChoices

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(Insider Story)
Galen Gruman

How to give your phone an Android-12-inspired privacy upgrade

1 week ago

Android 12 sure is an onion of an update, wouldn't ya say?

Now, don't get me wrong: I'm not suggesting it's fragrant, likely to make you cry, or positively delicious when cooked in a stir-fry. (That'd be one heck of a piece of software!) I just mean that it has lots of layers to it, including some that are beneath the surface and impossible to see when you're only glancing from afar.

Android 12 is full of changes both big and small, in fact — and while many of its most noticeable external elements will be limited to Google's own Pixel phones, some of the improvements tucked away in those sticky lower layers are arguably the most important changes of all.

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JR Raphael

Acronis teams with Jamf to secure the Apple-centric enterprise

1 week 3 days ago

As the Mac security journey becomes ever more challenging, there's fresh activity in the Mac security and enterprise infrastructure space: Acronis Cyber Protect Cloud now integrates with leading enterprise management platform Jamf.

Acronis and Jamf: Better together

That’s a significant step forward in terms of better native Mac support from Acronis, which has been working to widen its support for Apple’s platform since at least 2014 when it introduced Mac support for Acronis Access. It’s also a significant indicator that despite the existence of a few hold-outs, most enterprises now recognize that the future of work is remote.

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Jonny Evans

About the Pegasus spyware, Apple's telling the full truth

1 week 3 days ago

When it comes to security and privacy issues, Apple generally does a far better job than its rivals — though admittedly for selfish marketing reasons. When comparing Apple's iOS and Google's Android, it's hard to not see that at least Apple makes a good-faith attempt at being security- and privacy-oriented, compared to Google, which would prefer selling ads and anything else it can think of.

Still, Apple has been known to twist and shift the truth, omitting germane background info and context when it’s convenient. Remember antenna-gate? The battery-gate brouhaha?

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Evan Schuman

Pegasus spyware and iPhone security

2 weeks ago
Amnesty International's Security Lab revealed that a handful of iPhones, mostly belonging to journalists and human rights activists, were successfully infected with Pegasus spyware. While the majority of iPhones users are not affected, the spyware, created by NSO Group, was found even on newer iPhone models equipped with the latest iOS update. Apple bills the iPhone as the most secure consumer cellular product on the market, so this wave of malware raises security concerns. Computerworld Executive Editor Ken Mingis and Macworld Executive Editor Michael Simon join Juliet to discuss iPhone security and more.

Scary ‘malware-as-a-service’ Mac attack discovered

2 weeks ago

Another day, and it's time for another Apple security scare: malware that can harvest keystrokes and log-ins and is available on the Darknet for only $49.

Malware-as-a-service for Mac attacks

Check Point Software’s research team claims to have identified the hack, which it is calling XLoader. Enterprise security specialists managing Macs and Apple devices (of which there are many) need to be aware of the new attack, as we’re told it can:

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Jonny Evans

iPhone spyware: It's a dirty job, but NSO's gonna do it

2 weeks 3 days ago

Amnesty International has revealed that NSO Group, an Israeli ‘surveillance as a service’ company, has created and sold a nasty iMessage attack that can be used to spy on journalists, activists, and political representatives using their iPhones.

A zero-click hack attack

What makes this latest attack particularly dangerous is its exploitation of zero-click vulnerabilities, meaning targets don’t even need to read or open the iMessage carrying the hack. Amnesty says all iPhones and iOS updates are vulnerable to the exploit, which gives attackers “complete access to the device’s messages, emails, media, microphone, camera, calls and contacts.”

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Jonny Evans

In the fight against ransomware, Microsoft must do more

2 weeks 3 days ago

Not a day goes by that I don’t hear about some business or consultant affected by ransomware. Often, the incident starts with a phishing attack or from a vulnerability introduced by delayed patching. Or it could be a consultant tool that should have been coded better. Regardless of how it began, if you attempt to recover from a backup (assuming you have a viable one on hand) or pay the ransom and attempt to unencrypt your data, recovery will take time.

That’s time companies often don’t have.

Last week, the US government set up the Stopransomware website to help businesses, schools, and other organizations deal with ransomware attacks. Included in the guidance are recommendations regarding backing up:

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Susan Bradley

A big July Patch Tuesday — and the ongoing print nightmare

2 weeks 5 days ago

This week's Patch Tuesday release from Microsoft is a big one for the Windows ecosystem; it includes 117 patches that handle four publicly reported and four exploited vulnerabilities. The good news: this month's Microsoft Office and development platform (Visual Studio) patches are relatively straightforward and can be added with minimal risk to your standard patch release schedules, and there are no browser updates. Alas, we have a really serious printer issue (CVE-2021-34527) that was released out of bounds (OOB) and has been updated at least twice in the past few days. That means you need to pay immediate attention to the Windows updates and that you add all of the Windows desktop patches to your "Patch Now" schedule. 

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Greg Lambert

To patch or not to patch: That is the question

3 weeks 2 days ago

Security is more important than ever—and ransomware is bigger and badder than ever.  Barely a week goes by without a major new ransomware attack.

One way you can slow down, if not stop, such attacks is by keeping your mission-critical applications and operating systems up to date. There’s only one little problem with that. Those patches, especially Microsoft's Windows patches, can be more trouble than they’re worth. What’s a business to do?

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Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols

Google abandons URL shortening in Chrome

1 month 2 weeks ago

Google has called quits on the notion of truncating URLs in Chrome, according to a note from earlier this month in the Chromium project's bug database.

"This experiment didn't move relevant security metrics, so we're not going to launch it," Emily Stark, a staff software engineer on the Chrome team, wrote in the June 7 entry.

Android Police first reported on Stark's note June 10.

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Gregg Keizer

Windows updates: The four basic patch personalities

1 month 3 weeks ago

If you ask most people what they dislike about Windows 10, they’d probably say it’s the monthly updating process and the disruption it triggers. Depending on your personality type (and how risk averse you are), here’s how to handle Windows updates, deal with the changes, and keep your sanity in the process.

Bleeding-edge patchers

Are you a risk-taker who loves the bleeding edge? Do you look forward to trying out new technologies, dealing with green-colored blue screens of death (BSODs) and happen to have a spare computer that you can use to provide feedback and search for error messages? If so, the Insider version of Windows 10 is for you.

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Susan Bradley

6 zero-days make this a 'Patch Now' Patch Tuesday

1 month 3 weeks ago

Microsoft this week pushed out 50 updates to fix vulnerabilities across both the Windows and Office ecosystems. The good news is that there are no Adobe or Exchange Server updates this month. The bad news is that there are fixes for six zero-day exploits, including a critical update to the core web rendering (MSHTML) component for Windows. We've added this month's Windows updates to our "Patch Now" schedule, while the Microsoft Office and development platform updates can be deployed under their standard release regimes. Updates also include changes to Microsoft Hyper-V, the cryptographic libraries and Windows DCOM, all of which require some testing before deployment.

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Greg Lambert

Securing the Apple mobile enterprise takes context

1 month 3 weeks ago

Apple’s prescence has expanded from being the brand behind a few Macs in the creative department; it is now a key mobile and productivity provider across every top enterprise. But even Apple’s platforms face security challenges as people work remotely. I caught up with Truce Software CEO Joe Boyle to discuss Apple in the workplace and his company’s approach to managing the mobile enterprise.

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Jonny Evans

WWDC: Why iCloud+ will help secure the enterprise

1 month 3 weeks ago

One of the biggest surprises of WWDC 2021 was Apple’s introduction of iCloud+, an upgraded version of its existing service available at no additional charge that provides secure emailing and VPN-style security for users.

iCloud just became a useful business tool

The introduction of these features will transform iCloud into a very useful remote business tool, though it will be interesting to see whether all these features will be available to enterprise folks making use of Managed Apple IDs for their business tools. For the present let's assume they will, given the deep value they promise to those in that sector.

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Jonny Evans

WWDC: Apple digs deep to secure its platforms

1 month 3 weeks ago

Apple’s WWDC announcements included plenty for enterprise professionals. One area that deserves  particular attention relates to the variety of privacy improvements the copany is making, because they offer significant benefits for the security conscious.

Putting you in control of your data

The main thrust of Apple’s recent work on privacy is information. The argument is that everyone should know about data collection, what it means, and which apps collect what information — and have at least some understanding of how that data is used.

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Jonny Evans
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23 minutes 9 seconds ago
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About SecurityFeeds

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Tim Weil is a Security Architect/IT Security Manager with over twenty five years of IT management, consulting and engineering experience in the U.S. Government and Communications Industry.  Mr. Weil's technical areas of expertise include IT Security Management, Enterprise Security Architecture, FISMA Compliance, Identity Management, and Network Engineering. Mr. Weil is a Senior Member of the IEEE and has served in several IEEE positions.